السبت، 9 فبراير 2019

Why it’s risky to talk to other insurance companies


Why it’s risky to talk to other insurance companies

By talking to the insurance adjuster for the other driver, there is a good chance that you are mucking up your own case. That insurance company will try to use whatever you say against you later in the claim, whether it was your fault or not. Insurance adjusters are very well trained to use what you say against you.

Look, there is no legal requirement for you to cooperate or talk to the other insurance company.

But this will rarely or ever stop that insurance company from trying to contact you. If they do, it’s a good idea to not take the call and to talk to an attorney.

When you do speak to anyone about the accident, note the details of your conversation in your post-accident journal (link opens printable PDF form).

They will want to record you

If you talk to the other driver’s insurance company, the adjuster will probably want a recorded statement. The adjuster will chat you up in a very friendly way, and say something like:

‘We can really speed up the claims process if you provide a recorded statement.’

What is the Best Way to Handle Another Person’s Insurance Company after a Car Accident?
Contributor: Enjuris Editor
How can I contribute?

I was in an automobile accident and my car was totaled. It was the other driver’s fault. How should I deal with their insurance company?
The other person’s insurance company after a car accident – friend or foe?

Short answer: you don’t.

Many experts would advise you against speaking with the other person’s insurance company. While you do need to call your own car insurance company to report the accident, you are under no obligation to talk to the other driver’s insurance carrier.

The best way to deal with the other insurance carrier in most serious car accidents is to consult with a personal injury attorney. He or she will deal with them.

Why should you do that?

The other driver’s insurance company isn’t looking out for you. (See how to tell when you need a lawyer.)

The other insurance company isn’t your friend
Insurance companies always have a financial interest in protecting the interests of their client. And of course, they have an interest in protecting their own financial interests. They represent both interests by doing two things as much as they can:

Denying the maximum number of car accident claims outright.
Negotiating the lowest possible settlement possible on other car accident claims.
This boils down to the following: to reduce claims they pay, the insurance company must deny claims made.

Most car accident victims aren’t insurance adjusters or attorneys.

The insurance adjuster knows that. You’re on their home field and it’s their rules. They will use their superior knowledge of the insurance claims game against you.

Why it’s risky to talk to other insurance companies
By talking to the insurance adjuster for the other driver, there is a good chance that you are mucking up your own case. That insurance company will try to use whatever you say against you later in the claim, whether it was your fault or not. Insurance adjusters are very well trained to use what you say against you.

Look, there is no legal requirement for you to cooperate or talk to the other insurance company.

But this will rarely or ever stop that insurance company from trying to contact you. If they do, it’s a good idea to not take the call and to talk to an attorney.

When you do speak to anyone about the accident, note the details of your conversation in your post-accident journal (link opens printable PDF form).

They will want to record you
If you talk to the other driver’s insurance company, the adjuster will probably want a recorded statement. The adjuster will chat you up in a very friendly way, and say something like:

‘We can really speed up the claims process if you provide a recorded statement.’

If you do talk to the other driver’s insurance adjuster and they want to record the conversation, do not do so! You definitely should talk to a personal injury attorney.
A recorded statement may be very damaging. Sometimes, your statement may actually show that you do not have a valid accident claim. If you don’t have a claim, your injuries and property damage are on you.

The bigger problem is that a recorded statement can be used to undermine a legitimate accident claim. Here’s some sneaky ways they might do that:

The insurance adjuster will look at the statement you give them with the statement you gave the police. They also will read over the statement you would make if the case involves a lawsuit.
If they spot any inconsistencies in these statements, the claim might get denied. It’s not unusual for a person to tell the accident story slightly differently if he gives it four or five times over three months.
Adjusters will often ask you tricky questions that can make you answer in a way that hurts your claim. Occasionally, an aggressive adjuster may push you to agree to facts that you don’t know are accurate. You might get annoyed, and say, ‘I guess so,’ to get the guy to leave you alone. That could hurt your case big time.

If your car accident case goes to trial, the defense can use your recorded statement to the insurance company to cross examine you. That could have been months ago, and heck if you can remember what you said. Any contradiction you make with your previous statement can be very damaging. A good defense attorney will highlight the discrepancy for a jury and make hay out of it.
Let’s be fair: Not every insurance company will play games with you on the phone. But if they do try to undermine your case, it can really screw things up.
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